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Posts from — May 2013

Sunken City Brewing Company Grand Opening on Friday, May 10 at 4 p.m.

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Sunken City Brewing Company, Southwest Virginia’s newest craft brewery located in Westlake Towne Center on Rt. 122 at Smith Mountain Lake, will celebrate its grand opening on Friday, May 10 with a ribbon cutting ceremony at 4 p.m. Bruno’s GastroTruck will be on-site for the celebration as well as the band Barefoot West who will perform around 5:30 p.m. Come out and meet Sunken City Owner, Jerome Parnell and Brewmaster, Jeremy Kirby.

Sunken City will be selling 20-oz. imperial pints during the opening including two of their signature beers Dam Lager and Red Clay IPA. Dam Lager is an American-style amber (4.7 percent ABV) and Red Clay IPA is an amber-colored India Pale Ale (7 percent ABV).

In the near future, Sunken City plans to brew additional beers with hopes to distribute their beer throughout the state.

Officials and business leaders broke ground on Sunken City Brewing Company back in August 2012 and is Franklin County’s first microbrewery. The $2.3 million, 8,800-square-foot project, features a features a 25-barrel brewhouse, automatic canning distribution, a tasting room, pub and an outdoor beer garden. Sunken City Brewing Company, named for the villages that were submerged when Smith Mountain Lake was created, is expected to create 20-25 new jobs within five years.

May 7, 2013   No Comments

A for Accessible

When purchasing a Smith Mountain Lake home there are many considerations – space requirements, number of bedrooms and bathrooms, location, proximity to work and services. Additionally, there are the aesthetics, the style of the home, its condition, and price. However, there are other important considerations that many people overlook – and these fall into the realm of Accessibility.

The term Accessibility is often used in relation to public buildings and public transportation, and we know about it largely because of a piece of important legislation called “The Americans with Disabilities Act”, or ADA. The ADA provides the framework that ensures that public structures are able to be used by a wide population, including people in wheelchairs and those who have other physical challenges, to ensure their success in a wide range of “major life activities”.

If you have ever tried to go somewhere or reach something that was essential to your well-being, but beyond your grasp, you know the frustration and helplessness that this can evoke. Imagine facing this time and again, in your own home. Whether you are facing a physical challenge due to an accident, or aging and can no longer move and achieve as you used to, your home should be a place where you can live, work and play in a way that is easy for you. Sometimes this means that issues of “accessibility” are at play.

Accessibility can also come into focus when you have a visitor to your home that uses a wheelchair or walker, is blind, or cannot use stairs for some reason. Aged or injured guests benefit from a home that is thoughtfully designed with accessibility as a focus.

While it is possible to retrofit or remodel a home to make it more accessible, this can be an expensive and time-consuming process. Some of the principles of accessibility to consider when purchasing a home include:

  • Can everyone, of all ages and abilities, use the home equally well?
  • Are the rooms “flexible” – can they be used for a variety of activities?
  • Are items in the house simple and intuitive to use?
  • Is it easy to see where you are in the house?
  • Do the entrances make sense?
  • Is storage easy to find and use? Are closets in the right places?
  • Is it a safe place?
  • Are there railings and places to hold on to, at heights good for all ages?
  • Do stairs, windows, and hallways make sense? Are bathrooms where you expect them to be?
  • How much physical effort is required for day-to-day activities?
  • Has effort been made to make it easy to see and get to all features?
  • When a home is designed and built, it should meet the needs of people despite their age or ability. The ability for it to be flexible and adaptable is an important factor, so that as needs change the home does not create obstacles for the inhabitants or guests. Modern architecture began following the adage, “Form follows function” early in the 20th century, and home buyers are advised to evaluate homes in light of functionality as well as style.

Difficulties arise when homes present barriers to the people who live in or visit them. If the owner ages significantly and loses abilities that made living in the home possible, then something must change. If babies or children enter the scene who might be hurt by stairs or other hazards, those dangers must be addressed. Accidents or other medical issues can result in sudden changes in mobility or self-sufficiency requiring adjustments to improve accessibility. In short, it might be prudent to consider accessibility when buying, building, or remodeling a home.

Looking at a building’s “bones” enables you to understand right away where barriers might occur. Pay attention to hallways, doorways and stairs – even when there are just one or two steps, as each of these elements can be an obstacle to someone who has mobility or sight issues. While doorways can be widened, hallways are more difficult to modify. Additionally, hallways can be dark areas and “wasted” space. Is there a good place for a lift-chair or elevator should someone in a wheel chair have to go up stairs? How easy will it be to control the light, reach counters and cabinets, enjoy the grounds, live daily life?

Cabinets, doors, faucets and switches can be difficult to operate, but easy if you think clearly while choosing these options. As you move around your home, look at these features and how it would feel to use each of these should your hands become stiff or painful. Traditional doorknobs can be replaced by lever-style “knobs” that could even be operated with an elbow or chin in an emergency. Faucets that operate with levers are also useful, as are switch-plates that operate with a simple touch – but beware that they are intuitive to use.

When you are buying a home that might require “adjustments” to afford the accessibility that you desire, consider the spaces and structure of the home. Is there enough property to create ramps to the entrance? Is it feasible to enjoy the best areas of the home and property if mobility is impaired? Are there steep inclines on the property or is the property exposed to extreme weather conditions that could increase hazards seasonally? Look at the approach to the property and how close you might bring a car to the entrance. Are the walkways easy to traverse?

Understanding the more challenging issues around a home or property might not rule it out, but will give you insight into the cost of overcoming these potential obstacles. Pay close attention to bathrooms and stairwells to ensure that you would have the space you need to adjust bathtubs and showers, or to install lifts. Is there a bedroom or office on a lower floor? In the event that it is needed, having an option to create single-level living arrangements could be a boon to your family.

Homes are designed to shelter people and their possessions, provide space for cooking and eating, hygiene, and sleeping. Entertaining in your home is a luxury for some, and a necessity for others. In each function, age and physical ability must come into play, and so architects and builders who consider accessibility up front will usually build more adaptable homes. If you believe that accessibility could be an issue for you or members of your family, consider taking the time to have an expert evaluate a property that you would like to buy. There is a list of professionals in the area of accessibility through the National Council on Aging In Place (NAICP.org). Going in with your eyes open will result in long-term satisfaction and a plan for the house and people alike.

May 6, 2013   No Comments

Prudential Real Estate’s Q1 Consumer Outlook Survey

Prudential Real Estate’s Q1 Consumer Outlook Survey, conducted in February 2013, showed that Americans’ sentiment toward real estate is growing increasingly favorable. Buyers and sellers alike said they are motivated for the spring buying season, attracted by low mortgage rates, attractive home prices and other factors. Here are key survey findings:

MARKET ON THE MEND

  • 77% of consumers feel confident about the housing market and property value recovery; a 4 point improvement  from our year-end results and a 7 point increase over the same period a year ago.
  • This confidence is exceptionally high among Millennials (80%) and Generation X (79%) and in recovering  residential real estate markets like the South (81%) and West (79%).
  • Favorability of the U.S. real estate market also has increased to 65%, its highest level in a year.
  • However, Americans are cautious and 42% of those surveyed believe the housing recovery will be slow.
  • Ultimately, owning a home is still important to 96% of Americans and exceptionally important to Millennials (97%), Generation X (98%) and women (78%).
  • For those who’ve been watching market fluctuations in recent years, 74% of respondents say that interest rates are historically low and 87% say the time to buy is now while mortgage rates and average home prices are attractive.

SPRING BUYING SEASON

  • Finding a good deal in a home (80%) and job stability (59%) are the most important factors for prospective homebuyers this spring.
  • Respondents who feel it will be easier to buy a home this spring feel that way because market conditions are right and “homeowners want to sell.”
  • Prospective buyers are motivated; 48% of respondents said they are willing to explore neighborhoods they hadn’t previously considered to find their home.
  • Prospective home-sellers indicated that “finding the right house to buy first” and “making a profit” were the primary reasons they would list their homes this spring.
  • 87% of sellers are committed to seeing a sale through if their home doesn’t sell quickly.
  • 62% of sellers are willing to make repairs or redecorate in order to attract more interest in their properties.

CONTEMPLATORS

  • “Contemplators” are defined as those who have considered buying or selling real estate in the past year but didn’t. Contemplator confidence in the real estate market and property values continues to rise with a 12 point increase from mid-2012.
  • Additionally, contemplator favorability of the real estate market has jumped 10 percentage points since mid-2012.
  • Primary reasons why contemplators haven’t made a move include “waiting for the right opportunity” and “haven’t found the right home.”

May 2, 2013   No Comments